Social Programs—Housing [USA]

There are several programs which provide housing but these can vary state by state and within the state by local areas.  Housing programs include senior housing and low income housing.

Senior Housing Programs

For those who are concerned about housing in the future, senior housing programs are available within the United States although these can vary from region to region.  Generally, one must be 62 years of age to qualify for these programs. As housing is in short supply, they usually involve getting on a waiting list and can take several years.  Some waiting lists are available at age 59.

There are income requirements but these can vary; often one makes a financial contribution based on the level of income (about one third of income). This can make living on Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) feasible.

These are usually one bedroom apartments within a community setting with other senior services available. Many are located in urban areas.

The strategy suggested is for monastics to research areas where they would like to live and to contact the local governmental housing program for information about available housing.  One would then contact the housing communities for the necessary information and application to be placed on a waiting list.  Again, depending on the area, it can take time to advance on the waiting list.

Low Income Housing Programs

In addition to senior housing
programs, there are also low income housing programs in most states, although these can vary
from region to region.  Some provide opportunities to rent at levels based on one’s income. Other programs have been developed to help individuals actually purchase housing stock.  Many programs focus on providing housing for families although not exclusively.

As housing is in short supply, these programs usually
involve getting on a waiting list which can take several years. 

There are income requirements but these can vary; often one makes a
financial contribution based on the level of income (about one third of
income). Others may have restrictions on total personal assets (cash, property, etc.) that can be owned by an individual.

These are mixtures of studio, one, two + bedroom apartments or townhouses, often within a community setting. Some are reserved below market rate units at in a larger market rate housing complex.  Some have been developed specifically for lower income housing. Many are located in urban areas.

The strategy suggested is for monastics to research areas where they
would like to live and to contact the local governmental housing
program for information about available housing.  One would then
contact the housing communities for the necessary information and
application to be placed on a waiting list.  Again, depending on the
area, it can take time to advance on the waiting list.

If you have questions on any of these resources, please feel free to contact office@imisangha.org